Stories to Remember

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This program was supported by:

Stories to Remember

  • How can stories heal?
  • How do stories tell us who we are?
  • Why are some stories “stories to remember?”

Life’s fundamental questions have so often been approached through philosophy and science. Yet for millennia, these same questions have been answered for human beings everywhere, through the power of story. From different cultures come those stories we tend to remember, the stories that connect us, not just with others, but with “that” which gives our lives meaning.

This unique program brings together two guests who use the power of story and storytelling to remember what is important. Kay Olan, a renowned storyteller from the Mohawk nation in upstate New York, meets community organizer & youth mentor, Orland Bishop, who brings the power of story and African wisdom traditions to his work with members of the notorious LA gangs, the Crips and Bloods.

Where to Watch on PBS

Program Guests

Kay Olan

Kay Olan

Kay Olan is a renowned storyteller from the Wolf clan of the Mohawk Nation in upstate New York. She is a former teacher and former director of the Kanatsiohareke Mohawk Community. She visits the Ohlone territory in Northern California for a unique meeting with storytellers from California’s Ohlone and Coast Miwok tribes.

Orland Bishop

Orland Bishop

Orland Bishop, founder of Shade Tree Multi-Cultural Foundation, integrates the metaphysics of the African wisdom traditions and the power of storytelling with his mentoring work with youth in South Central Los Angeles who are still navigating the fragile peace of the territorial borderlines of the famous gangs, the Crips and the Bloods.

Share Your Thoughts

2 Comments

  1. Gary Rametta

    another compelling, revealing discussion that evokes a state of spiritual elevation among the panelists and viewers alike.

    both times I’ve watched full episodes of Global Spirit, I’ve been deeply moved.

    especially in today’s era of heightened nationalist and reactionary movements among the body politic here and abroad, it is more important than ever to realize, remember, understand and reinforce the truth of our interconnectedness as human beings of one family. when one of us suffers, we all suffer. when one of us rejoices, we all rejoice. we are interdependent, and to ignore or try to obstruct that is a sure-fire recipe for own ultimate extinction.

    For me, Global Spirit is a stand out among all television series because it consistently shows it has that exact mission in mind. The subjects, stories and views it presents transcend both religious/dogmatic limitations and national/political boundaries.

    i’ve felt humbled and grateful both times I’ve watched Global Spirit. I thank KCETLink for including it in its programming.

    Reply
  2. Nicole C Weld

    I have increasingly felt a deep calling to support connection – connection between humans, connection with our Earth – connection with ourselves. Working with young people it saddens me to witness the phenomenon of disconnection spreading to the very young at such a rapid pace. This episode of storytelling and story sharing has inspired a sense of love and purpose in me that I have been longing to find. Thank you so very much – I am now looking to create an after-school program in my community that brings together stories from the elders and stories from young people that inspire a tangible connection. Thank you thank you thank you.

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